Friday, 9 March 2012

Friday My Town: Front Doors

 

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If you don’t think your shop has an inviting enough front door,
you can try putting an extra one on display outside.
(Found this week on a street in town.)

 

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Old cottage with keyhole-shaped doors in our Open Air Museum. This kind of cottage was common in these parts of Sweden from the Middle Ages until the mid 19th century.

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07-Juli-2011

The door on an old wooden church, also in our Open Air Museum.
If you go inside, you’ll find (among other things) an even older door:

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Cinema/movie theater ‘Moulin Rouge’ built 1914, preserved as notable building.
Below, the same building seen from the back

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Knock on more doors at Friday My Town Shoot Out

14 comments:

  1. Love the old door. The mosaic of the red church is very creative.
    QMM

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  2. these doors are A-Mazing! love them All! i really really really love that cottage, grass on the roof, keyhole doors, old wooden siding. LOVE IT ALL. and a way cool door with the candle on it.

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  3. How unusual - keyhole-shaped doors. Did they have a purpose or were they purely a design idea?

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    1. I suspect it's just a design. I've not found any explanation for it, only notes that small porches with this shape seem to have been common (or not uncommon) in a rather limited area from the west coast and inland to around the parts where I live.

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  4. Love the keyhole shaped doors - probably the in thing before they used keys? Next time I see an old door laying around (it could happen!) I will know what to do with it. Would never have thought to use it as a feature until I saw that shot! Well spotted!

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  5. That old cottage with the keyhole doors is amazing and beautiful. Maybe it is just my imagination, but that first door outside with the manikan looks an awful lot like it was once the top of a coffin...which is in a grotesque kind of way, another kind of door.

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    1. Hmmm... I don't think I ever saw a coffin top with a lock like that! Would that be to make sure no one could get in, or that no one could get out? ;) No, I do think it's an old door; though perhaps not a front door to a house.

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  6. Super old doors, too many to pick just one favourite, however must be a devil of a thing to get the lawn mower on the grass roof.....

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  7. What a fun filled post with such a wonderful array of images. I especially like the "keyhole" doors.

    I'd Rather Be Birdin'

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  8. when I saw the keyhole shape I thought immediately about the viking headdress. they were twice as wide as the man's shoulders..... I know, I know no facts just free association. I spent a few moments with Google to see what I could fine. There are references of 'keyhole doors' in Mosques, synagogues and most surprising in the mesa homes of the American Indians.

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    1. Laughing at your viking association... Sorry. Modern historians and archeologists say the Vikings did not actually wear horned helmets (possibly on special occasions for ritual purposes but there is no proof even of that). And old though this type of cottage may be, it does not go back to the Viking age. ;)

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  9. LOVING this!!! My faves are #2, #3, #4, and #5!!!!! Each one of these pictures could be a whole post on it's own!! Is there any reason for the keyhole shape, or is it just a pretty design?

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  10. The keyhole door is extremely attractive! I'm thinking that's a cozy cottage.

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